The Myth of the Holiday Blues

For many people, the holiday season inspires feelings of joy, gratitude and charity. For others, the added duties of shopping, cooking, wrapping and hosting lead to feelings of stress, anxiety and loneliness. (In, all likelihood, most people experience both happiness and increased stress levels in November and December.) [Read more…]

Philanthropy Is Good For You

You may have heard the buzz this week about Giving Tuesday, a nationwide movement to encourage Americans to donate to charities the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Or maybe you came across an iconic bell ringer standing next to a bucket to collect donations at your local shopping center. [Read more…]

The Evidence on Giving Thanks

Millions of people will gather with family and friends this week to celebrate what may be one of the most quintessential American holidays – Thanksgiving.

As its name implies, Thanksgiving is all about giving thanks – or showing appreciation or gratitude. It turns out there is a significant body of scientific literature demonstrating that thankfulness. [Read more…]

Is Red Meat Really Bad For You?

If you follow news about nutrition, you’ve likely heard the recommendations to avoid eating red and processed meats including beef, sausages and deli meats.

[Read more…]

What Interventions Help to Prevent Suicide?

Every suicide is heartbreaking, leaving loved ones wondering what went wrong and how they could have prevented such a tragedy.

And yet suicide rates are currently at their highest level since World War II, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. In 2017, there were more than 47,000 recorded suicides in the U.S. – a 33 percent increase compared to 1999.

But what can we do about the devastating problem of suicide? [Read more…]

Is Vitamin D A Worthwhile Supplement?

There are three main ways that people obtain vitamin D—by eating foods rich in vitamin D, by ultraviolet rays from the sun reaching the skin, and by taking a supplement. Over the past 10 years, doctors have worried that people living in northern latitudes don’t absorb enough sunlight to prompt their bodies to manufacture their own vitamin D. [Read more…]

Do Obesity Treatments for Youth Lead To Eating Disorders?

One-fifth of all school-aged children in the United States are obese – triple the rate measured in the 1970s.

If you think about this carefully, you realize its staggering implications. People who are obese are more likely to experience a broad range of health problems including diabetes, breathing problems, cancer, heart disease and joint problems. They are more likely to be victims of bullying, have low self-esteem and experience depression. And they are more likely to be obese as adults, which is linked to more of the same health problems. [Read more…]

The Evidence on Medical Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

As scary as it is to think about, we know that all people make mistakes, including the health care professionals who work in hospitals and doctors’ offices. Furthermore, our health care system is complicated, leading to glitches that can harm patients. As a result, patients sometimes experience injuries, complications and even death as a result of the care they receive. [Read more…]

Paying Smokers to Quit Really Works

Smoking is bad for you – that’s common knowledge. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease, disability and death in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. [Read more…]

The Growing Problem of Weight Discrimination

More than 93 million Americans are obese. That’s nearly 40 percent of the U.S. population. Researchers and healthcare providers have invested time and money in studies to explain why so many Americans are so overweight and what our society can do about it [Read more…]

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