Is Red Meat Really Bad For You?

If you follow news about nutrition, you’ve likely heard the recommendations to avoid eating red and processed meats including beef, sausages and deli meats.

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Do Obesity Treatments for Youth Lead To Eating Disorders?

One-fifth of all school-aged children in the United States are obese – triple the rate measured in the 1970s.

If you think about this carefully, you realize its staggering implications. People who are obese are more likely to experience a broad range of health problems including diabetes, breathing problems, cancer, heart disease and joint problems. They are more likely to be victims of bullying, have low self-esteem and experience depression. And they are more likely to be obese as adults, which is linked to more of the same health problems. [Read more…]

A Low-Salt Diet May Not Be Essential After All

If you or anyone you know has heart disease, you’ve probably heard the ubiquitous recommendation that people with heart problems should follow a low-sodium diet. [Read more…]

You May Not Need a Vitamin D Supplement

More than half of adults in the U.S. take some type of vitamin each day – a number that has grown steadily over the past 20 years, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. [Read more…]

Are Carbs the Culprit?

New evidence from a sweeping study of diet choices reinforces the old adage, “Everything in moderation.” [Read more…]

What We Know About Fasting For Weight Loss

Fad diets come and go as often as trains in a busy station and many suggest completely different approaches to weight loss. Protein-based diets encourage participants to forgo processed foods and carbohydrates. Programs like Weight Watchers prescribe a healthy diet with a variety of foods but restrict calories for weight loss. And plant-based diets eliminate animal products including meats and dairy foods. [Read more…]

How much alcohol is too much?

A glass of wine with dinner. A beer at a barbecue.

For decades, the U.S. Dietary Guidelines advised that drinking in moderation would not lead to medical problems for healthy adults and may even improve heart health. But a new analysis published last month in the British journal The Lancet calls into question the idea that an alcoholic drink or two a day is harmless. At the same time, critics say the review does not account for other factors – such as diet, exercise, and socioeconomic status – that may influence a person’s overall health. [Read more…]

Are Nutrition Labels an Effective Weapon Against Obesity?

Millions of Americans make goals to lose weight every year. Diet books, weight-loss apps, and meal supplements abound. But research shows changing our environments may have a more significant influence on our food choices, and ultimately our health. [Read more…]

New Evidence Finds Vitamins Are Often Unnecessary

Americans spend more than $36 billion a year on vitamins and nutritional supplements – all in the hopes for leading healthier lives. More than half of Americans take at least one vitamin a day, and millions take more than that. But do vitamins actually improve your health? [Read more…]

New Evidence Links Sugary Drinks and Obesity

You have, no doubt, heard the statistics about obesity in the U.S: Nearly forty percent of adults and nineteen percent of youth are obese, the highest rate the country has ever seen, according to the most recent data from the National Center for Health Statistics. We hear all sorts of reasons why people gain weight such as too many sugary drinks, not enough physical activity, and a lack of access to healthy foods. [Read more…]

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