What We Know About Aging and Pain

License: CC0 Public Domain

Do you think that growing older involves experiencing more pain?  You’re right.

Research shows that older adults experience more frequent pain compared to their younger counterparts, and they are less likely to receive treatment for that pain. A study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control shows that approximately 50 million older adults experience significant or chronic pain every year – a result of stiff, aging joints, diseases such as cancer, injuries and surgeries. And a significant number – up to 40 percent – don’t receive adequate treatment for their pain. [Read more…]

Cold Weather, Aching Joints? Think Again!

For centuries, doctors and patients have believed that cold, damp weather contributes to joint pain.  In fact, there is evidence this theory dates back to Hippocrates in about 400 B.C.  [Read more…]

How to navigate health care choices

no-attribution-cc0-public-domain-roads-320371Older adults are more likely to suffer from medical problems and face more frequent decisions about their health care. This could mean anything from deciding whether to receive a flu vaccine to choosing among cancer treatments. [Read more…]

Do “Brain Games” Sharpen Your Mind?

no-attribution-cc0-public-domain-brain-951874_1920More than 6 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, and that number is expected to grow significantly as the U.S. population ages. As a result, researchers across the globe are trying to find ways to strengthen aging brains and prevent dementia later in life. Over the past decade, scientists have zeroed in on “brain training” – puzzles and games designed to improve cognitive skills – as one possible solution. [Read more…]

What we know about aging Americans and their caregivers

no-attribution-cc0-public-domain-elderly-1461424_1920It is no secret that the U.S. population is steadily growing older. More than 77 million American children were born between 1946 and 1964, and that generation is now beginning to reach its senior years.

As the U.S. population grows older, it’s important to monitor elders’ health and well-being. There’s a federal agency — The Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics — set up to do just that. [Read more…]

The evidence on retirement

retirementThe other day, a friend who is nearing retirement age stopped me in the gym locker room.  “I want to know what the evidence says,” she told me. “Is retirement going to be good for me?” [Read more…]

New evidence on the gap between rich and poor

retireeThe founders of our nation set out to create a place where people could build a life for themselves. Their original idea was that U.S. citizens would be free to pursue happiness and prosperity. But more than 200 years later, a body of evidence shows the gap between the rich and the poor is widening. [Read more…]

A new measure for aging

agingFor centuries, humans have been searching for a fountain of youth to reverse the effects of aging.  While no one has ever found one, scientists are getting closer to understanding why some people age with fewer ailments than others, and what that means for anti-aging therapies. [Read more…]

How old is your heart? It matters for your health!

heartIn recent years, public health researchers have developed a novel framework for identifying the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. It’s called “heart age.” [Read more…]

The body of evidence on reducing your risk of dementia

lonelyAs the world population ages, dementia is expected to affect more people than ever before — more than 65 million people worldwide by 2030. One of the first symptoms of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease is cognitive decline: forgetting words and names, losing items and struggling with planning and organizing. [Read more…]

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