Regular Exercise Will Lengthen Your Life

Regular exercise is, hands down, one of the best actions you can take to lengthen your life, according to a new, longitudinal study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [Read more…]

You May Not Need a Vitamin D Supplement

More than half of adults in the U.S. take some type of vitamin each day – a number that has grown steadily over the past 20 years, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. [Read more…]

Global Review Finds Most People Need More Exercise

It’s no surprise that exercise is good for us. There is a significant body of evidence that demonstrates a wide range of benefits to regular physical activity. This includes improved cardiovascular health, stronger bones, reduced risk of developing cancer, increased likelihood of maintaining a healthy weight, better sleep, fewer mental health problems and an overall higher quality of life. [Read more…]

Are Carbs the Culprit?

New evidence from a sweeping study of diet choices reinforces the old adage, “Everything in moderation.” [Read more…]

Do Violent Video Games Make Kids More Violent?

If you know a tween, teenager or avid gamer, you have probably heard about the latest video game phenomenon: Fortnite. In the game’s Battle Royale mode, up to 100 players parachute into a small island, scavenge for armor and weapons, and then kill or hide from other players in an attempt to be the lone survivor. The game’s cartoonish violence and quirky features–including costumes and custom dance moves–have attracted more than 125 million players across all the globe since its release last September. [Read more…]

Does Sunscreen Really Prevent Skin Cancer?

More than 3 million Americans develop skin cancer each year. Our understanding of how skin cancer develops is limited; the only known medical strategy  to lower the risk of developing skin cancer is to avoid skin damage from the sun. There are several ways to accomplish this: stay inside during the middle of the day, wear clothing and hats to cover your skin, and – of course – use sunscreen.
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Why Do Youth Self-Injure?

Self-injury is defined as harming oneself on purpose, but without the intention of committing suicide. Research finds that about 17 percent of adolescents harm themselves intentionally. Girls are more likely to begin injuring themselves at a younger age, and use more serious forms of self-injury. Boys are more likely to injure themselves when they are high or drunk, or when they are in a social setting. [Read more…]

What We Know About E-Cigarettes and Health

Since their debut in 2004, electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes have steadily grown in popularity. Approximately 9 million U.S. adults regularly use e-cigarettes, and that includes a growing number of teen-agers. In 2015, one in six high school students reported using an e-cigarette in the past month. [Read more…]

What We Know About Fasting For Weight Loss

Fad diets come and go as often as trains in a busy station and many suggest completely different approaches to weight loss. Protein-based diets encourage participants to forgo processed foods and carbohydrates. Programs like Weight Watchers prescribe a healthy diet with a variety of foods but restrict calories for weight loss. And plant-based diets eliminate animal products including meats and dairy foods. [Read more…]

How much alcohol is too much?

A glass of wine with dinner. A beer at a barbecue.

For decades, the U.S. Dietary Guidelines advised that drinking in moderation would not lead to medical problems for healthy adults and may even improve heart health. But a new analysis published last month in the British journal The Lancet calls into question the idea that an alcoholic drink or two a day is harmless. At the same time, critics say the review does not account for other factors – such as diet, exercise, and socioeconomic status – that may influence a person’s overall health. [Read more…]

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