The Health Risks of Vaping

Since their debut in 2004, electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes have steadily grown in popularity. Approximately 9 million U.S. adults regularly use e-cigarettes, and that includes a growing number of teenagers. In 2015, one in six high school students reported using an e-cigarette in the past month. [Read more…]

What Can We Do About Youth Homelessness?

Somewhere between 1 and 1.7 million youth under the age of 18 are homeless in the United States, with often destructive consequences.  Young people who experience homelessness are at high risk for a variety of physical and mental health problems, violence and early death. [Read more…]

What Interventions Help to Prevent Suicide?

Every suicide is heartbreaking, leaving loved ones wondering what went wrong and how they could have prevented such a tragedy.

And yet suicide rates are currently at their highest level since World War II, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. In 2017, there were more than 47,000 recorded suicides in the U.S. – a 33 percent increase compared to 1999.

But what can we do about the devastating problem of suicide? [Read more…]

Urging a Healthier Choice? Use Motivational Interviewing

Most of us have had periods of our lives when we did not make the healthiest choices. Maybe you needed to lose weight, or your cholesterol was too high. Maybe you went through a stressful period when you drank too much, smoked cigarettes, or didn’t get enough sleep. [Read more…]

Is Vitamin D A Worthwhile Supplement?

There are three main ways that people obtain vitamin D—by eating foods rich in vitamin D, by ultraviolet rays from the sun reaching the skin, and by taking a supplement. Over the past 10 years, doctors have worried that people living in northern latitudes don’t absorb enough sunlight to prompt their bodies to manufacture their own vitamin D. [Read more…]

Are the Germs in Your House Making You Sick?

Germs surround us everywhere; that’s a fact of life. But there are some places—even in your own home—that are breeding grounds for bacteria. Let’s take a careful look at what the evidence says about where the germs live in your house. [Read more…]

Do Obesity Treatments for Youth Lead To Eating Disorders?

One-fifth of all school-aged children in the United States are obese – triple the rate measured in the 1970s.

If you think about this carefully, you realize its staggering implications. People who are obese are more likely to experience a broad range of health problems including diabetes, breathing problems, cancer, heart disease and joint problems. They are more likely to be victims of bullying, have low self-esteem and experience depression. And they are more likely to be obese as adults, which is linked to more of the same health problems. [Read more…]

The Evidence on Medical Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

As scary as it is to think about, we know that all people make mistakes, including the health care professionals who work in hospitals and doctors’ offices. Furthermore, our health care system is complicated, leading to glitches that can harm patients. As a result, patients sometimes experience injuries, complications and even death as a result of the care they receive. [Read more…]

How Racism Affects Youth Health and Well-being

We’ve written previously about how racism affects the health and well-being of millions of Americans. The evidence demonstrates that people who experience racial discrimination are more likely to have a range of health problems, including poorer mental health and a lower quality of life.

[Read more…]

The Evidence on How Kids Learn To Read

Reading is an essential life skill that predicts success on many levels later in life. There is clear evidence demonstrating that young people who do not learn to read proficiently are more likely to live in poverty, achieve a lower educational level, and become involved with the criminal justice system. [Read more…]

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