Review: Knee surgery for cartilage tears

meniscusThe most common knee injury today is a torn meniscus, which is a rip in the cartilage that cushions the knee joint. There are two groups of people who commonly suffer this injury: athletes who twist their knees and older people who are more likely to have degenerative tears as cartilage becomes weaker with age.

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Evidence-based sports: Can a team have too many star players?

adult-sportsFootball season is in full swing in the U.S.!

Most people who follow professional sports have ideas about why some teams prosper while others don’t. Usually, those ideas are personal opinions. But is there any evidence about what components make a winning professional sports team?
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Evidence-based motivation

aging_activeDo you ever find it hard to accomplish what you set out to do?   I know it’s a problem I encounter sometimes, especially in this era of instant communication where there is so much distraction. So what’s the best way to get something done?

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How important is breakfast, Part 2

food allergyEarlier this week, we wrote about the body of evidence that shows eating breakfast does not lead to weight loss. But does eating breakfast impact cognitive function and learning?  As my kids head back to school this week, it’s certainly a question on my mind.

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How important is breakfast?, Part 1

breakfast cerealCrowning breakfast as the most important meal of the day is a long-held conviction among many Americans and some nutritional experts. In reality, there are data on both sides of the debate showing that breakfast is essential to maintaining a healthy weight, and also that breakfast is no more important than any other meal for weight loss. Recently, new evidence sheds more light on the topic. [Read more...]

How to brush your teeth

toothbrushAre you surprised to find out that dental organizations around the world recommend different techniques for teeth-brushing?  I sure was.  But what surprised me even more is the lack of evidence that one method works better than another.

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The science of cooking

As gardens and local farms are in full swing this month producing vegetables of all sorts, I’ve found myself revisiting  America’s Test Kitchen to make sure I’m using evidence-based techniques in my kitchen. I thought it’d be a great time to revisit this post about this culinary research center. [Read more...]

New data on kids’ well-being

kids_runningEnsuring our youth grow up in healthy supportive environments is an important part of building a strong future for any society.  Even here in the United States, there are significant disparities in child well-being. [Read more...]

Evidenced-based learning: Play, play, play

My two oldest children received letters in the mail this week from their teachers – a sure sign that “back-to-school” is creeping closer. As I start wrapping my head around school supplies and book schedules, I thought back to this post about the importance of play in learning. I’m hoping that my kids’ teachers keep in mind the importance of play in the classroom this year.

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Gardening as a treatment for dementia

GardeningResearchers believe nearly 4 million Americans over age 60 suffer from some form of dementia.  Their symptoms may include memory loss, impaired judgment and reasoning, loss of communication skills, agitation and paranoia. [Read more...]